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Austrian privacy group complains to Google

According to NOYB, this code is present on almost every 306 million active Android phones in the European Union.

  • The Austrian online privacy campaign group has filed a complaint against Google over the tracking code being “illegally” installed on Android phones.
  • According to NOYB, the Android Advertising Identifier code is created “without the user’s consent” and “acts like a license plate that can uniquely identify a user’s phone and share it between businesses.”
  • According to NOYB, this code is present on almost every 306 million active Android phones in the European Union.

The Austrian online privacy campaign group said Wednesday that it had filed a complaint with Google over a tracking code that was “illegally” installed on Android phones.

The complaint from NOYB is related to Google’s Android Advertising Identifier (AAID) and has been filed with CNIL, the French data protection agency.

According to NOYB, AAID codes are created “without the user’s knowledge and consent” and “act like a license plate that uniquely identifies a user’s phone and can be shared between businesses.”

In addition, NOYB (no business for you) states that users do not have the option to remove the code and may generate a new tracking ID.

It states that it violates the requirement under the EU’s e-Privacy Directive that users give informed consent for such tracking.

Stefano Rossetti, NOYB’s privacy lawyer, likened the code to “put colored powder on your feet and hands to mark every step and action, everything you touch within the mobile ecosystem.”

According to NOYB, this code is present on almost every 306 million active Android phones in the European Union.

The latest complaint follows a similar complaint made by NOYB against Android last year in Austria.

NOYB has used EU privacy law to file legal objections related to online privacy in various jurisdictions of Europe.

In November, a similar code was used on Apple’s phone called IDFA (“Advertiser’s Identifier”) to file proceedings against Apple in Germany and Spain.

Among the founders of NOYB was privacy activist Max Schrems. He has won a series of legal victories over online privacy.

Due to a legal complaint from Schrems, the EU Supreme Court has withdrawn an online data arrangement known as the “Privacy Shield” between Europe and the United States.

In 2015, another proceeding filed by Schrems ruined previous EU-US transactions that tech giants relied on to do business.

Austrian privacy group complains to Google

Source link Austrian privacy group complains to Google

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