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Flood rescues Ukrainian village from Russian occupation

  • The small village of Demydiv in Ukraine was deliberately flooded to ward off Russian troops.
  • Residents say it was worth it even though they are forced to move around in boats.
  • Russia’s invasion is now in its third month.

The deliberate flooding of a small village north of Kiev, which created a swamp and submerged basements and fields but prevented a Russian attack on the capital, was worth all the victims, residents said.

Ukrainian forces opened a dam early in the war in Demydiv, causing the Irpin River to flood the village and thousands of acres around. The move has since been credited for preventing Russian soldiers and tanks from breaking through Ukraine’s lines.

“Of course it was good,” said Volodymyr Artemchuk, a 60-year-old resident of Demydiv.

He added:

What would have happened if they (Russian forces) … were able to cross the small river and then went into Kiev?

More than a third of some fields have been flooded, said Oleksandr Rybalko, 39.

About two months later, people in the village were still dealing with the effects of the flood, using rubber boats to move around and plant the dry parts of the land that were left with flowers and vegetables.

Children were left with wetlands to use as playgrounds.

The Russian invasion, now in its third month, has claimed thousands of civilian lives, sent millions of Ukrainians on the run and turned cities into ruins.

Moscow calls its actions a “special military operation” to disarm Ukraine and protect it from fascists. Ukraine and the West say the fascist claim is unfounded and that the war is an unprovoked act of aggression.

Over the weekend, Russia on Sunday defeated positions in eastern Ukraine to try to encircle Ukrainian forces in the battle for the Donbas.


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Flood rescues Ukrainian village from Russian occupation

Source link Flood rescues Ukrainian village from Russian occupation

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