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US offers $ 5m bounty for Rwandan genocide refugees if UN ban is lifted

  • The US State Department has offered a reward of US $ 5 million for information leading to the arrest of five Rwandan genocide refugees.
  • U.S. and foreign government officials, including military and police, are not eligible to claim the R80 million.
  • Reports in Zimbabwe say a UN team is in the country to investigate allegations that one of the perpetrators died there 10 years ago.

Twenty-seven years after the Rwandan genocide, five more key figures have yet to be found and prosecuted, with the US State Department raising US $ 5 million (approximately R80 million) for information leading to their imprisonment.

The suspected refugees are Protais Mpiranya, 62, who was once believed to be hiding in Zimbabwe or South Africa, Aloys Ndibati, who, as mayor of the Kibuye municipality, participated in the killings, and Fulgence Kayishema, 62, a judicial inspector at the time, Phenias Munyarugarama, 74, then a senior officer in the former Rwanda Armed Forces, and Charles Ryandikayo, 61, a businessman in Kibuye at the time.

The State Department, through the War Crimes Rewards Program (WRCP), said, “The genocide in Rwanda took place 27 years ago and some of those responsible are still unaware. Submit an indication resulting in an arrest and be paid “.

“US and foreign government officials, including military and police, are not eligible to receive WCRP rewards if the information is provided in the performance of official duties.”

READ | Rwandan report says France ‘bears a significant responsibility’ over genocide

The Zimbabwe Independent newspaper based in Harare, this week reported that a team of investigators under the United Nations International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT) were in the country, searching for Mpiranya.

Some earlier reports claimed that Mpiranya had died in the country decades ago, but IRMCT sought to verify these allegations.

The Zimbabwe Independent, citing anonymous sources, said a grave had been identified and plans to dig it up for DNA were underway to determine if it was Mpiranya.

The Rwandan genocide took place between April 7 and July 15, 1994. Within 100 days, members of the ethnic Tutsi minority, moderate Hutu and Twa, were killed by armed militias.

At least a thousand people who participated in the genocide were understood to have fled Rwanda. They have been wanted for war crimes ever since.

Years of research and follow-up by Paul Kagame’s administration led to the conclusion that many of their flights were to neighboring countries.

READ | Rwandan genocide ‘kingpin’ Theoneste Bagosora dies in Mali prison – sources

Since then, Rwanda has cooperated with other countries in areas of security and crime among which people sought for their role in the genocide.

The last prominent arrest was Ladislas Ntaganzwa, 60, in 2015.

Ntaganzwa, as mayor of Nyakizu, a municipality of Butare, was instrumental in the massacre of thousands of Tutsis at various locations.


The News24 Africa Desk is supported by the Hanns Seidel Foundation. The stories produced through the Africa Desk and the opinions and statements that may be contained therein do not reflect those of the Hanns Seidel Foundation.

US offers $ 5m bounty for Rwandan genocide refugees if UN ban is lifted

Source link US offers $ 5m bounty for Rwandan genocide refugees if UN ban is lifted

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